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Abbreviations

Last Updated 08/01/2018

A.B./B.A.

Artium Baccalaureus “Bachelor of Arts”

A.D.

Anno Domini “In the year of the Lord”

A.M.

Ante Meridiem “Before the middle of the day”

A.M./M.A.

Artium Magister “Master of Arts”

A.U.C.

Anno Urbis Conditae “In the year of the founding of the city (Rome)” (Basis of Roman dating prior to B.C. and A.D.)

a.v. / ad val.

ad valorem “in proportion to the value”

ad lib.

ad libitum “at one's pleasure” (Freely, spontaneously)

c./ca.

circa “Near / About”

cf.

confer “Bring together / Compare”

d.

denarius “Penny” (In British coinage)

D.G.

Dei gratia “By the grace of God”

D.O.M.

Deo Optimo Maximo “To God the Best the Greatest”

D.V.

Deus Vult. “God wills it.”
Deo Volente “God being willing / If God is willing”

e.g.

exempli gratia “For the sake of example”

et al.

et alii “And other persons” et alibi (et alius + ibi) “And elsewhere”

etc.

et cetera “And other things”

et seq.

et sequens/sequentes “And the one/ones following”

ibid.

ibidem (ibi + idem) “In the same place” (In footnotes, the same work as the one just cited)

id.

idem “the same thing”

i.e.

id est “That is”

I.H.S.

In Hoc Signo “In this sign (of the Cross)”
Iesus Hominum Salvator “Jesus the Savior of Men”

I.N.R.I.

Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum “Jesus the Nazarene King of the Jews”

J.D.

Jurum Doctor “Doctor of Laws”

lb.

libra “A pound (in weight)”

l.c. / loc. cit.

loco citato “In the place having been cited”

Lit.D. / Litt.D.

Litterarum Doctor “Doctor of Letters (Literature)”

M.D.

Medicinae Doctor “Doctor of Medicine”

N.B./n.b.

Nota bene. “Note well.”

op. cit.

opere citato “In the work cited”

Ph.D.

Philosophiae Doctor “Doctor of Philosophy”

P.M.

Post Meridiem “After the middle of the day”

P.S.

Post Script “Written after” (Appended information)

pro tem.

pro tempore “For the time” (Temporarily)

prox.

proximo / proximo mense (archaic) “In the next month”

Q.E.D.

Quod Erat Demonstrandum “Which was to be proved” (Euclid)

Q.E.F.

Quod erat faciendum “Which was to be done”

q.v.

quod vide “Which see / Whom see”

R.I.P.

Requiescat in pace “May he/she rest in peace.”

sc., scil., ss.

scilicet (shortened form of scire licet, “It is permitted to know / that is to say / namely”

S.P.Q.R.

Senatus Populusque Romanus “The Roman Senate And People” (Que means “and.”)

st.

stet “Let it stand.” (It is correct and should not be changed.)

ult.

ultimo / ultimo mense “In the preceding/last month

u.s.

ut supra “As shown or stated above”

vid.

vide “See”

viz.

videlicet “It is permitted (to a person) to see / It is clear / Clearly / Plainly / To be sure”

vs.

versus “against”

Collected by Edith E. Smith, M.A.

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